The Silent Eye’s 2016 Summer pre-solstice event

 

St David's montage

Shake off the Winter blues – Anticipate the Summer ahead and book now for the Silent Eye’s 2016 pre-Solstice weekend, “Whispers in the West”, to take place in the ancient landscapes of Pembrokeshire, West Wales,  June 17-19, 2016.

We will base ourselves in the ancient Celtic city of St David’s, near to the cathedral, whose site dates back to the 6th century. St David’s will be the main focus of the Sunday morning walk and talk. The ancient city offers a good choice of hotels and well-priced guest houses as well as a choice of restaurants.

From the magical traces of the ancient Druids, through the splendour of St David’s Cathedral to the modern and unchanged landscape of Pembrokeshire, the weekend has much to offer.

We will be conducted by a local member of the Silent Eye School who knows the landscape and its history well.

Our outline itinerary is:

17-19 June, 2016

Friday Afternoon 17 June

Drive to Whitesands beach – ice cream

Walk to St David’s Head – hut circles – Coetan Arthur burial chamber

Dinner in St David’s

Saturday 18 June

Drive to Newport via Carreg Samson and Carreg Coetan Arthur burial chambers

Walk up Carn Ingli for magnificent view

Drive to Pentre Ifan – the most impressive chamber in Wales

Drive to Nevern church – Ogham stones – bleeding yews

Drive to Cwm Gwaun for a drink at Bessie’s pub

Drive to St Gwyndaf’s church at Llanwnda near Strumble Head

Dinner at The Sloop in Porthgain or St David’s

Sunday 19 June

Walk to St Non’s – new chapel – old chapel – well

Walk to Cathedral and Bishop’s palace

Lunch in the refectory

Walk along to the bridge and up Quickwell Hill

(If people want to stay into the afternoon there is a lovely boat trip round Ramsay Island)

The cost to attend the weekend is £50.00. Hotel and meals are not included in that figure and those attending need to make their own accommodation arrangements.

Register your interest via email to rivingtide@gmail.com

(Images from Wikipedia, used under Creative Commons license)

Animal Magic #3…

Ravenstone

(Photo – Sue Vincent)

…Taking his cloak, his horn, and his clarsach, Gwythyr went to
Red Bull, “I have come to ask whether or
not you know the whereabouts of Big Chief Hawthorn, and
his daughter Creiddylad whom I am destined to sleep with?”

Said Red Bull, “When first I came here
there was a plain with no trees save for a solitary sapling,
and the sapling grew to be an oak of one hundred branches,
but now all that remains of the oak is a withered stump, and
from that day to this though I have heard tell of such a man,
I have never yet come across him of whom you inquire.”

Said Gwythyr-the-Bright, “O Mighty
Bellower of the Open Field will
you tell me what you know?”

“Indeed I will young Gwythyr but what I have heard
will not be easy on your ears, for it is said, that with
him, none can keep pace on horse-back or on foot;
and so lightly does he tread that the grass
neither breaks nor bends beneath his feet;

and that if his way lies through a wood
he goes along the tops of the trees;

and he is as good a guide in the land never seen
as in his own, and that, young Gwythyr, is all I can tell you
but White Raven may know more of him than I do.”

So Gwythyr took his cloak, his horn, and his clarsach, and he
went to White Raven, “I have come to ask
whether or not you know the whereabouts of Big Chief Hawthorn,
and his daughter Creiddylad whom I am destined to sleep with?”

Said White Raven, “When first I came here that wide
valley below was a wooded glen which when the race of men came they
rooted up, and there grew a second wood but that too the race of men
up-rooted, so that the wood you see before you is the third that has
grown here, yet in all that time though I have heard tell of such a man
I have never yet come across him of whom you inquire.”

Said Gwythyr-the-Bright, “O Great
Gorger on the Field of Battle will
you tell me what you know?”

“Indeed I will young Gwythyr but what I have heard
will not be easy on your ears, for it is said that from
him none can wrest a smile until he is satisfied:

and that when sad his bottom lip
drops below his waist like a belt,
and when angry his top lip rises
above his head like a cap;

and that when visiting he leaves not
cooked nor raw, nor fat nor lean, nor
cold nor hot, nor sweet nor sour;

and that when at home he feasts
until noon, drinks until night,
and then devours the heads of vermin,
and that, young Gwythyr, is all I can tell you, although Yellow Owl may know more of him than I do.”…

Crucible of the Sun

12

 Weekend of 22-24 April, 2016.

Great Hucklow, Derbyshire Dales. England.

Click the image for further details of this weekend workshop with the Silent Eye

and a special appearance by Mister Fox.

foxy wedding 222

Leaf and Flame: The Foliate Man #2

2

“…where strange things, strife and sadness,

at whiles in the land did fare,

and each other grief and gladness

of fast have followed there…”

– J.R.R Tolkien

#2 Hart to Heart

…“In which the Ladies of the Round rediscover the Tale of Blessed Bran, Merlin and the Lady re-convene the Assembly of the Wondrous Head, King Arthur and his Knights go hunting and Gawain enters the Enchanted Forest in pursuit of the hart and stumbles upon another ‘Death-Pact’ the solution to which lies in the discovery of the correct answer to an elusive riddle.”…

The eyes have been dotted, the tees have been crossed, to all intents and purposes the ‘donkey work’ of writing the five dramas for next year’s April Workshop: Leaf and Flame- The Foliate Man has been done. There will undoubtedly be minor changes between now and then, there always are and these are usually flagged up in the communal read throughs which will take place at our three remaining monthly meetings.

There is still an awful lot of work to be done in terms of music, props, costuming and the presentations which are used throughout to properly set the tone and theme for the weekend…

But more importantly what we really need now is… people!

So, what are you waiting for?

12

 Weekend of 22-24 April, 2016.

Great Hucklow, Derbyshire Dales. England.

Click the image for further details of this weekend workshop with the Silent Eye

and a special appearance by Mister Fox.

HM15 091

Station to Station XIV…

x hobhurst, ballcross, bakewell, sheffield weekend 014

A Psychological Interpretation

Pontius Pilate = Super Ego
Jesus = Ego
Water-Bearer = Id

There has always been debate about the number of Stations…
Is it fourteen or is it fifteen?
And what is a station anyway: a stationary point in the journey or a passage from one point to another?

Sensibly, The Condemnation, and the Receipt of the Cross must start the sequence, in that order, and also sensibly the Nailing, Death, Deposition and Entombment, in that order, must end the sequence unless one wishes to posit the un-canonical episodes as visions on the cross which we do not…

Which leaves eight icons and eight is the ‘Jesus number’.
It is difficult not to have the Stripping before the Nailing…
…which leaves seven icons.

Meeting the mother must come after the receipt for the cross is the symbol of the mother or of what she gives and the first fall follows for who wouldn’t stumble under the burden of such a weight?

Next come the women and Jesus’ injunction may simply be a statement which is followed by another fall for who could be so bold without being brought back down to earth?

Next comes Veronica who really provides the key and she is followed by another fall but by this time it no longer really matters which is where Simon comes in…

Simon stands in the same relation to Jesus…
…as Jesus stands in relation to Joseph.

Joseph = Higher Self

Simon = Lower Self

Strangely enough Jesus’ garment at the Condemnation more closely resembles the winding sheet of the tomb than the robe of the stations…

‘…And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time…’
– T.S. Eliot, The Four Quartets

x hobhurst, ballcross, bakewell, sheffield weekend 014

Station to Station XIII…

x hobhurst, ballcross, bakewell, sheffield weekend 012

 

Proverbs

You are like a fruit picker who loves the fruit but hates the tree.

You examine the face of heaven and earth without recognising
the one who is in your presence,
for you do not know how to examine the moment.

Know what is in front of your face,
and what is hidden from you will be disclosed.

What you look for has come but you do not know it.

The one who knows all but lacks the self is utterly lacking.

Come to me for my yoke is easy and my mastery gentle…

Dark Sage

Station to Station XII…

x hobhurst, ballcross, bakewell, sheffield weekend 010

Visualisations

Imagine the events represented by the icons playing out like a cinematic film in your mind’s eye.

Clearly visualise all the depicted figures as they are given and what happens to them as the cinematic story proceeds.

If some of the figures appear to flit in and then out of the scenes re-arrange the scenes so that their appearance is consistent with a design and purpose.

When the story is complete run and re-run it from start to finish.
Imagine being each and all of the figures in turn.

At the end of this process imagine being an objective observer of events.

Dark Sage

Station to Station X…

x hobhurst, ballcross, bakewell, sheffield weekend 007

Contemplations

A Week of Sorrows is a cycle.

A Fortnight of Sorrows is a bi-cycle.

The three falls of Jesus echo the three deaths of Merlin.

The haloed female figure may not be Jesus’ mother.

Joseph may be shown hooded for a reason.

The robe draped cross resembles the mast and sail of a boat.

The hooded figure may not be Joseph of Arimathea.

The figure helping to carry the cross may not be Simon of Cyrene.

The figures may depict aspects of the personality.

Dark Sage

Station to Station IX…

x hobhurst, ballcross, bakewell, sheffield weekend 017

Questions

 

If the story of Jesus is historical then why contemplate unhistorical episodes of that story?

Why would the Roman soldiers coerce Simon into helping carry the cross?

To what does the prophecy uttered by Jesus to the Women of Jerusalem refer?

What do the hieratic gestures of the hooded figure signify?

What do the colours of the women’s robes signify?

Why does it take two people to strip Jesus?

Why is one of them bare headed and the other not?

Dark Sage