Religious Syncretism: a proper priest…

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… “What are you talking about?”

“A question of questions, young Wendolina, the answer to which may serve as a stunning proof of our original assertion.”

Your original assertion, which was posed as a question anyway. And I’m older than you are.”

“Yes, yes, dearest Wendlebury. There was a need for the razor ban, in order, to achieve assimilation. The original model for Samson wasn’t Gilgamesh at all, it was his ‘alter-ego’, the wild-man, Enkidu, who in the words of birds-feet etched into tablets of baked-clay over four thousand years ago, possessed long hair like a woman and an excessively hairy body.”

“In that case the ‘jaw-bone’ may well be a form of boomerang…” muses Wen, and then, “Birds Feet?”

“Cuneiform.”

“If I wasn’t so confused, I’d be tempted to jump up and down,” says Wen.

“Two-thirds animal, one-third man.”

“Ah,” says Wen, the light of comprehension settling down to roost in her visage, “I knew the British Museum would be a good idea.”

“Rule Britannia!”

“Are we allowed to be rational for a moment?”

“We would not expect you to be anything else.”

“If we consider Enkidu who is two-thirds animal, one-third man, together with Gilgamesh, who is two-thirds divine, one-third man, and treat them as one whole man, we get a ruler who is one-third animal, one-third divine, and one third man.”

“The idea was to create harmony out of an imbalance. On his own Gilgamesh mistook arrogance for strength and had become a tyrant and tormentor of his people.”

“But the constructor of this tale would have to be a psychologist of far greater acumen than Carl Gustav Jung to have come up with that device.”

“But it gets better. The harmony doesn’t last for long. The human part of Gilgamesh corrupts the animal part of Enkidu and as a result, together, they visit an ecological disaster upon their civilisation.”

“This story is how old?”

“About four thousand years.”

“It’s not only high genius, it’s also pertinent.”

“Genius is always pertinent.”

“Do we know who the author is?”

“Do we ever know who the author is?”

“Do we know who the author is purported to be?”

“Gilgamesh existed as the legendary protagonist in a number of Sumerian poems long before ‘his story’ was turned into an ‘epic poem’.”

“So, who turned it into an epic poem?”

“The compiler of the first ‘epic’ now referred to as the Old Babylonian Version is unknown.”

“And the later version?”

“Five hundred years after the Old Babylonian version had been circulated a ‘scholar-priest’ called Sin-leqi-unninni revised and elaborated it.”

“Another name to conjure with.”

“Sin-leqi-unninni’s epic is now regarded as the Standard Version.”

“And in some quarters, at least, he is regarded as a genius with greater psychological acumen than Carl Gustav Jung.”

“Well, he was a priest.”

“A proper priest.

*

LORD OF THE DEEP: THE QUEST FOR IMMORTALITY

A DRAMATIC RETELLING OF THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH

The Oldest written story known to man…
What spiritual treasures lie hidden in this, five thousand-year old, Epic?
What can this ancient civilisation teach us about the questions of existence?
Join us on this quest of a life-time, next April, to find out…

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‘Gilgamesh is among the greatest things that can ever happen to a person.’
– Rainer Maria Rilke.

Fully catered weekend package, including room, meals and workshop: £235 – £260

Click here to download Booking Form

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6 thoughts on “Religious Syncretism: a proper priest…

  1. Reblogged this on Sun in Gemini and commented:

    Imagine being a high priest in the world’s first advanced civilisation and realising that mankind’s mind could take it dangerously out of harmony with the natural world…. Come join us in April for the re-enacted story of Gilgamesh…

    Liked by 3 people

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